Thursday, 12 December 2019

What is the MNLF or Moro National Liberation Front

MNLF is internationally recognized by the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and its Parliamentary Union of OIC Member States (PUIC).[9] Since 1977, the MNLF has been an observer member of the OIC.[10] On January 30, 2012, MNLF became an observer member of the Parliamentary Union of Islamic Cooperation (PUIC), as approved during the 7th PUIC global session held in PalembangIndonesia.[11]

The Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) is a political organization in the Philippines that was founded in 1972.[2][5] It started as a splinter group of the Muslim Independence Movement.[2] The MNLF was the leading organization among Moro separatists for about two decades beginning from the 1970s.[2]

In 1996, the MNLF signed a landmark peace agreement with the Philippine government that saw the creation of Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), an area composed of two mainland provinces and three island provinces in which the predominantly Muslim population enjoys a degree of self-rule.[6] Nur Misuari was installed as the region's governor but his rule ended in violence when he led a failed rebellion against the Philippines government in November 2001,[6] and fled to Sabah before being deported back to the Philippines by the Malaysian authorities.[2][7][8]

MNLF is internationally recognized by the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and its Parliamentary Union of OIC Member States (PUIC).[9] Since 1977, the MNLF has been an observer member of the OIC.[10] On January 30, 2012, MNLF became an observer member of the Parliamentary Union of Islamic Cooperation (PUIC), as approved during the 7th PUIC global session held in PalembangIndonesia.[11]

The Philippine government wanted to encourage migration of landless Christians from other parts of the country in a so-called Homestead Program (1903–1973). There was no land titling system by the natives of Mindanao at that time, and the Christian settlers exploited the situation. Lanao and Cotabato received an influx of migrants from Luzon and Visayas. Tensions between Moros and Christians were caused by disputes about land ownership and disenfranchisement of Muslims. The Homestead Program is one of the root-causes of the Moro conflict.[12][13]

Poverty, grievances of the Muslim population, weak rule of law and difficult terrain have made counterterrorism challenging against insurgents in the Southern Philippines.[14]

On March 18, 1968 there was an alleged massacre of Moro soldiers in Corregidor Island.[15][16] There has been a long-standing allegation that the Malaysia provided the initial training and arming of the first batch of MNLF cadres known as "Top 90" in 1969.[3] Likewise, it has also been alleged that Malaysia was either seemingly ignorant or tolerated the illicit arms shipments, mainly from the Middle East, flowing into Mindanao that fueled the insurgency.[17]

The founder and former leader of the MNLF is Nur Misuari.[2] The MNLF was founded as a splinter group of the Muslim Independence Movement on October 21, 1972.[2]

 

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